James Dyson

James Dyson

James Dyson is a British designer, inventor and maker, who is creating sensations with his ingenious electric devices. For James Dyson design always means, how something functions not what it looks like - Design should come from function.

Everyone knows the feeling to get upset about appliances in everyday life. "I could have done that better", one might think. But how many people actually put their thoughts into action - James Dyson does. He is having fun designing products that function better.

James Dyson´s first product, the "Sea Truck", was already being produced in 1970. At that time James Dyson was studying at the Royal College of Art. A few years later he developed the award winning "Ballbarrow", a wheelbarrow, which could not sink into the ground because of its ball-shaped wheel. It was followed by the "Wheelboat", an amphibian vehicle, the "Trolleyball", a boattrailer that also has ball-shaped wheels.

In 1978 while vacuum-cleaning his house, James Dyson got upset about his vacuum cleaner loosing his suction power. He wanted to find out why and put his interest onto the functionality of the dust bag. Doing that he found out that the small pores should keep the dust inside allowing the air to stream out. The dust however clogged up the pores not letting the air circulate properly. With a blocked airstream the suction power was decreasing. So James Dyson decided to create a well performing vacuum cleaner. After 5 years of development and 5.127 prototypes later, it was finally there: The first vacuum cleaner from Dyson without a dustbag.

Surprising but true: James Dyson´s first vacuum cleaner without a dustbag was being sold in Japan, the homeland of high tech products. The ´G-Force´ won the Japanese "International Design Fair Prize" in 1991. The Japanese were so impressed of the efficiency, they made the ´G-Force`a status symbol that sold at a retail price of US$ 2.000 a piece!

With this success in the background James Dyson soon founded the company Dyson. Today he has over 2.000 employees there and is represented in 47 countries. About 300 engineers and scientists are working at the Dyson research and development center in the British Malmesbury, developing all new Dyson products and technologies. From there the foundation was set for the launching of new products, like the Dyson Ariblade hand dryer and the Air Multiplier, a ventilator without the rotor blades.